Applying Kao as a Takedown

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Applying Kao as a Takedown

Post by Scott M. Rodell » Wed Mar 30, 2005 9:13 am

Having practiced martial arts formally since I was nine, I have always been quite flexible & could get into low stances. I used this to my favor in tuishou by using kao to strike much lower that the standard heart level target. When my duifang would try to use cai to pull me down, I would step in, sink low & strike to his hip or thigh. Since few people even try to apply kao this low, my duifang typically assumed that my sinking down was actually his sucess in pulling me to the ground. So he was generally surpirsed when my shoulder hammered into his leg.



Seeing the surprised expression on my duifang's face I would quote the Yang Family Transmittions, "Yang Luchan could shoulder strike to the knee."



Of course when you say things enough it starts to get into your own brain. So I asked why did Yang strike so low? I was also at the time thinking about how an advanced student should be able to use each movement as a strike, lock or takedown. Going thru the Michuan form with this in mind, I realized just what an efective single leg take down kao is.



Below is a series of 9 photos taken at full speed that demonstrate how to use kao as a take down. After this series there are 3 separate photos showing typical errors when attempting to apply kao in this manner.
Last edited by Scott M. Rodell on Wed Mar 30, 2005 9:18 am, edited 1 time in total.

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Kao Take Down Photos 1

Post by Scott M. Rodell » Wed Mar 30, 2005 9:14 am

Image



These first 3 frames illustrate how to shoot in. From a ready position, thrust off your back leg to quickly move forward. As you do this, it is useful to poke toward the duifang's eyes as you thurst forward. this is helpful in two ways. One it helps to propel you forward & two it distracts the duifang making it look like you are jabbing for the head, while also blocking his or her vision for a moment as you move forward. In the 3rd photo we see how the hand that jabbed toward the eyes begins to curve downward to its standard postion in kao along the inside of the thigh (only in this case it will end up behind the duifang's heel).
Last edited by Scott M. Rodell on Wed Mar 30, 2005 1:15 pm, edited 1 time in total.

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Kao Take Down Photos 2

Post by Scott M. Rodell » Wed Mar 30, 2005 9:14 am

Image

In this 2nd part of the series, we see the result of the shoulder striking the duifang's knee. As mentioned above, one hand goes behind the duifang's heel, this holds it in place for a moment, causing his knee to lock as you strike. The other hands goes on the duifang's knee next to where you are striking with your shoulder to make sure it doesn't slip to the side.



It is important to note that while every student of taijiquan is familiar with rooting while standing upright with the flat of the foot on the ground, one can root thru any part of the body that is touching a solid surface. In this case, I am maintaining my root in both my feet even though the front foot is on the ball AND I am rooting thru my front knee.
Last edited by Scott M. Rodell on Wed Mar 30, 2005 1:23 pm, edited 1 time in total.

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Kao Take Down Photos 3

Post by Scott M. Rodell » Wed Mar 30, 2005 9:14 am

Image

This last series of photos shows one possible follow up to the take down. Kao, when properly execuited, hits like a sledge hammer. When used as a take down, it can slam the duifang to the ground pretty hard. If he is disoriented, then you can use the follow up demonstrated here. If he is a wrestler who knows how to take a fall, its better not to expose yourself by standing up as I demonstrated here. We drill this take down in this manner because its a good test of whether & how well you are able to mantain your root after the take down.



The details of this follow up are: maintaining your root in the your front knee, swing the rear leg forward & use deng (heel kick) to the duifang's grion. Switch your weight to the leg you just used to kick, then bring the other leg forward to stomp down to the duifang's throat or head. (When practicing this move, its best to stomp the ground next to the duifang's head, to make sure you do not accidently crush his windpipe).
Last edited by Scott M. Rodell on Wed Mar 30, 2005 1:34 pm, edited 2 times in total.

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Kao Take Down Errors 1

Post by Scott M. Rodell » Wed Mar 30, 2005 9:16 am

In this next set of 3 photos we see some common errors students make when applying kao as a take down.



Image

In this case the student on the right who is shooting the take down is misaligned. His body is turned forward. The result is that his weight is not centered over his root so that when he hits, he will loose balance, falling to his left in this case.
Last edited by Scott M. Rodell on Wed Mar 30, 2005 1:38 pm, edited 1 time in total.

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Kao Take Down Error 2

Post by Scott M. Rodell » Wed Mar 30, 2005 9:16 am

Image

In this case the error is that the student shooting is too far out & will not be able to hit his duifang's knee with his shoulder. Having failed to strike the duifang's knee, he should stand up right away, possibliy using the movement Green Dragon Rises Out of the Sea to strike from below. Or he can stay low & strike the duifang's leg with his fist.
Last edited by Scott M. Rodell on Wed Mar 30, 2005 1:41 pm, edited 1 time in total.

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Kao Take Error 3

Post by Scott M. Rodell » Wed Mar 30, 2005 9:17 am

Image

Off Balance, need I say more... ?

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Thanks to...

Post by Scott M. Rodell » Wed Mar 30, 2005 1:44 pm

Finally, Thanks to G-Man for being slammed to the floor repeatedly while we made sure we had all the photos required for this thread! I'm sure he loved every moment...

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Post by iglazer » Wed Mar 30, 2005 2:12 pm

G-Man was smilling in all the shots. He loved it.

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Other Take Down Applications From the Michuan Form

Post by Scott M. Rodell » Tue Feb 20, 2007 8:37 am

My Shishiung, George Hu of Houston, quite likes the take down application variants. I've learned more than a little from him. The current issue of Kung Fu Tai Chi magazine (March/April 2007) has an article: "Yang Taiji As A Fighting Art" by Dale Napier in which Master Hu demonstrates several takedown applications. Hu demonstrates applications for the Grasp the Sparrows Tail & Snake Creeps Down movements.

Enjoy...

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