Component parts of a safer test cutting sword.

This Forum is a place for students of swordsmanship to ask advice from moderators Paul Champagne & Scott M. Rodell on how to practice test cutting in a manner consistent with how swords were historically used in combat. Readers use this Forum at their own risk.

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xingyi24
Rank: Yang Chenfu
Rank: Yang Chenfu
Posts: 34
Joined: Mon Mar 02, 2009 2:45 pm
Location: Greenbelt MD

Component parts of a safer test cutting sword.

Post by xingyi24 » Tue Apr 07, 2009 5:53 am

Although there are many signs that a sword may or may not be good for test cutting, one of the best ways to judge any tool is also by taking it apart. Is there someone who is willing to either take apart a good cutting sword to describe and illustrate, hopefully with photos, all the parts of a good sword from the blade to the furniture? Additionally, if anyone has pieces from good examples, that serves much of the same purpose.

Scott M. Rodell
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Re: Component parts of a safer test cutting sword.

Post by Scott M. Rodell » Thu Apr 09, 2009 9:17 pm

xingyi24 wrote:... ways to judge any tool is also by taking it apart ...
I'm afraid a visual inspection alone of a sword, even disassembled, isn't sufficient to determine if a sword is strong enough for cutting practice. The reason is, for example, the tang might look thick enough, but you can't see what kind of steel it is, or if there are internal forging flaws. So every sword one intents to use for test cutting should undergo a through Structural Integrity Test (I cover how to do this in my book- http://www.sevenstarstrading.com/html/b ... ttingbook/ ).

xingyi24
Rank: Yang Chenfu
Rank: Yang Chenfu
Posts: 34
Joined: Mon Mar 02, 2009 2:45 pm
Location: Greenbelt MD

Re: Component parts of a safer test cutting sword.

Post by xingyi24 » Mon Apr 13, 2009 7:28 pm

So I see... After I opened this post I had a jian that looked totally safe bend so the tip is three inches off center when doing full speed, or maybe only most speed, xingyi jian forms. It wasn't side to side either. It leaned forward, toward an edge. There was no cutting even involved. I guess I have more to learn about metalurgy, and that's why we need to listen to professionals like Mr. Rodell and other non-marketers when it comes to safe(er) training tools.

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