Qing Zhong Miaodao

This forum is for posting Chinese Swordsmanship product test results conducted by Center Director, Scott M. Rodell. Any manufacturer may submit a product for testing.

Moderators: Scott M. Rodell, Philip Tom

Post Reply
Scott M. Rodell
Site Admin
Site Admin
Posts: 1364
Joined: Wed Jan 28, 2004 4:50 pm
Location: Virginia
Contact:

Qing Zhong Miaodao

Post by Scott M. Rodell » Mon Jul 20, 2009 8:47 am

Qing Zhong Miaodao
Qing Zhong Knife & Sword Company
List Price: $1400
Company Website: http://www.qing-zhong.com/

Solo Basic Cuts & Form Practice Test- It was a busy week when this sword arrived, but naturally I was curious about how it would preform, so whenever I found a free moment, I'd pull it out & run thru a bunch of basic cut drills in the back garden. As my schedule cleared a bit, I worked used this saber into my regular routine, practicing the Silu Miadao form with it in hand. I found this robust two-hander to have a lively balance that, though balanced for two-handed use, also plays fairly well for single handed cuts.

Image

Structural Integrity Test- Unfortunately the results of this test were very disappointing. From nearly the first, lighter cuts, the blade started showing problems with the edge deforming in several places. These were relatively small dents, but still large enough to cause concern. I worked up to medium power cuts, i.e. cuts that would not be quite strong enough to cut thru a 2" diameter bamboo stalk, but stopped when I noticed that the size of the edge deformation resulting from one of these cuts had increased to area over 1/4" wide. All together, less than 15 cuts were preformed during the course of this test. Afterwards, the edges was tested with a set of Hardness Testing Files & found to be quite soft for a sword blade, with an HRC less than 45. Sword blades are typically in the 55 to 60 HRC range.

Image

Hard Cutting Test- Given that the soft nature of the blade's steel caused the edge to deform, I felt it was too risky to move on to cutting hard bamboo. So this test was not conducted.

Historical Design Authenticity- The term "Miaodao" is a recent one in the Chinese arms & armor lexicon. Scholars in the field have yet to encounter this term in Qing or Ming period manuscripts. It seems the name Miaodao become popular from Republican times forward. Be that as it may, Chinese two-handed swords, both double edged & sabers, have a very long history in China (see- the video "Rediscovering the Chinese Long Sword" http://www.grtc.org/video-clips/redisco ... ong-sword/). Qing Zhong's Miaodao is similar in blade form & shape of fittings to those pictured in various texts with the pointed chape being reminiscent of Ming dynasty dao scabbards. The brass fittings are decorated with motifs typical of Long chuan forges, albeit in a manner that is larger than was typical for Qing era swords. So on the whole it can be said that Qing Zhong's Miaodao is an historically accurate piece.

Rating- Great for the wall, fine for form practice, but seriously wanting when it comes to any kind of cutting.

What I'd Like to See- This is the second saber I've tested for Qing Zhong. I was quite happy with the performance of the Ox Tail Saber I tested & obviously unhappy with the way this Miaodao preformed in cutting. Perhaps this was just a bad blade that wasn't hardened properly? In fairness, that can happen, & given the solid performance of their Ox Tail Saber, I'm left wondering which is the true representative of Qing-Zhong's work, the Ox Tail I tested or this Miaodao? At the moment they are 1 for 2... I always like to give the beneift of the doubt, so what I'd like to do to give them another chance & see what happens.

Post Reply

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 1 guest