Zheng Wu Long Yin Jian

This forum is for posting Chinese Swordsmanship product test results conducted by Center Director, Scott M. Rodell. Any manufacturer may submit a product for testing.

Moderators: Scott M. Rodell, Philip Tom

Post Reply
Scott M. Rodell
Site Admin
Site Admin
Posts: 1364
Joined: Wed Jan 28, 2004 4:50 pm
Location: Virginia
Contact:

Zheng Wu Long Yin Jian

Post by Scott M. Rodell » Sat Dec 15, 2007 7:38 am

Zheng Wu Long Yin Jian

Image

List Price: $1084 for 4000 layers up to $5691 for 64000 layers.
Company Website: http://www.zheng-wu.com/

Introduction- I have tested a number of swords from Zheng Wu Knife and Sword Co. all the reviews of which can be found here in this forum. All of these swords passed my standard testing with no problem (for testing standards please see: viewtopic.php?t=191). However, in follow up testing, these same swords failed & a number of problems came to light (see: viewtopic.php?t=609). In response to this, Mr. Zhou Zhengwu sent me the jian that is the subject of this thread. The result of my standard test is below. As time & weather permit, I will continue testing this jian on more demanding targets & report those results. Most of the hard cutting was to live bamboo 1 1/2" to 2" in diameter.

Solo Basic Cuts & Form Practice Test- I returned from a long teaching tour to find this jian waiting for me. Fresh from many hours of sword training I used this jian for my daily practice of basic cuts & cut combinations at full speed & power. I was quite pleased with its handling, finding this jian to be the best balanced modern jian I have handled to date. That is particularly impressive considering this sword weighs in at 2 lb.. 1 oz. (.94 k).

Image

Structural Integrity Test- I never take it easy on a sword at this stage in the testing. One must know without question that the sword in hand will not fail & the only way to ascertain that to put it to the test. Using the same dead pine tree I have in the past, I cut into it with a variety of cuts. This jian not only past the test, the test left barely a blemish on the blade. One has to really look closely to see any sign of use on the blade.

Image

Image

Hard Cutting Test- A sword of this weight should cut easily & this jian did. It not only preformed well on live bamboo up to 2" in diameter, it went thru 2" diameter unsupported stalks that were just stuck in the ground, whether cutting upward or downward. These cuts resulted in no visible damage or bends to the blade. The only change in the sword was a very slight loosening of the pommel. (As noted above, more demanding cutting will be preformed in the future & reported here).

Historical Design Authenticity- There is no question that this sword is 100% historically accurate. The style of the fittings are the classic Long Chuan (Dragon Well) style that any serious collector would recognize. The only detail that varies from period examples I have examined is that the hardwood scabbards of Qing examples have a glossy finish.

Rating- This is the best sword I've seen to date from Zheng Wu, well balanced & a good solid cutter. They have come a long way since I first tested one of their swords a couple of years back for SFI. Overall, it would be hard to ask for more from a factory produced sword, & honesty, more can't really be asked at this price level.

What I'd Like to See- Consistency. There has never been any real question in my mind that Zheng Wu can make an excellent sword, but it has also been my experience that each sword they produce is different from another. One assumes this is due t differing skill levels amongst the artisans at their factory. As the demand for better quality Chinese swords continues to grow, Zheng Wu will have to enforce strict quality control. As for this jian itself, I am quite pleased with it, one of the few things I would ask for though is a better finish on the scabbard and hilt, the finish is not bad at all, it could just be better.

Post Reply

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 1 guest