Taijiquan against common attacks

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Richful_jedi
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Taijiquan against common attacks

Post by Richful_jedi » Tue Mar 06, 2012 5:17 am

Over in this thread: viewtopic.php?f=5&t=1108 there is a discussion about using Taijiquan successfully in MMA. An interesting and important topic for the Taiji community. It got me thinking about how Taijiquan deals with attacks common to multiple arts.

Naturally this would usually be a lesson for the mat. I think here we have a collection of experienced and beginning Taijiquan players from different backgrounds, making it a great place to share ideas and compare notes. Rather than begin another X-style vs. Y-style thread, I'd like to discuss the common attacks any martial artist or citizen might face either on the mat or off it. Rather than focusing on complex moves (triple-spin kicks... bone breaking qi strikes.. ), lets stick with basics.

One thing I've always had trouble with is hooks. I've used Fair Lady Works Shuttles to deflect sloppy hooks and push back at my duifong, not so much with a trained boxers hook. Delivered in close with speed a proper hook is difficult to roll-back or peng - in my experience. I've had some success with a short, compact single whip to open the hooking arm enough to dissipate the incoming force. Anyone had success with other techniques?

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J HepworthYoung
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Re: Taijiquan against common attacks

Post by J HepworthYoung » Wed Mar 07, 2012 9:09 am

I don't think much about it, so it is good for me to ponder.

I tend to use Peng for a lot of stuff.

I tend to kick a lot too.
Common attacks... I guess punches are pretty common, I tend to just stick to them and they never seem to arrive.

I use a lot of wrapping and binding, tend to target the throat and top of feet, i use a lot of "cold" and "short" jins

More than anything sticking and listening type energies are the mainstay of my play.
Without them I am not very good.

I am having trouble thinking of common attacks. There are punches, pushes and kicks, bear hugs, choke holds etc all common.

Psi Man
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Re: Taijiquan against common attacks

Post by Psi Man » Thu Mar 15, 2012 3:07 am

Well, a fast inside hook is difficult to block against in general, but I agree that "fair lady works the shuttle" is how I would respond. If you know someone is fond of the hook (say, a sparring partner or tournament opponent), you might be able to move outside of range and roll it back and quickly respond, but otherwise you need a strong peng type response once inside their strike.

Training in DC with my senior classmates who are much more practiced/skilled in sanshou, there are definitely some who prefer close hooks and strong inside punches, and for those situations I would actually just try to void their strikes. Responding with a peng would be somewhat of a last resort (in other words, not a situation I would intentionally get into!).

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J HepworthYoung
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Re: Taijiquan against common attacks

Post by J HepworthYoung » Fri Mar 16, 2012 9:31 pm

Fast inside hook... Hmm
I tend to use a few methods for stuff like that
Mostly I stick, that voids a lot of attacks, but I use a few other methods.
One is a strike to the upper part of the arm that even with fast jabs does not move much.
There is a strike to the underside of the arm, a rising backfist to the artery/nerve on the inside/bottom on the upper arm.

One is to strike the opening that the hook makes, another is to let it arrive but not give it anything to hit.

Hooks tend to telegraph a lot. A straight wing chun type jab can be a bit harder, in my experience, to read and neutralize.

Richful_jedi
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Re: Taijiquan against common attacks

Post by Richful_jedi » Mon Mar 19, 2012 9:43 pm

Hi guys, thanks for replying.

Psi man - glad it's not just me. Yeah I think depending on distance it's a tough situation, get inside and peng/split or outside and void.
There is a strike to the underside of the arm, a rising backfist to the artery/nerve on the inside/bottom on the upper arm.
J - this sounds similar to the Block part of Block, Parry and punch. Backfist rising up, rolling over and opening the hooking arm. It might work if the hook is as you suggest, telegraphed.
Hooks tend to telegraph a lot. A straight wing chun type jab can be a bit harder, in my experience, to read and neutralize.
Which can be true, but not always. A good boxer/player knows the shoulder can telegraph a hook. Certainly worth a try.

Speaking of Block, Parry and Punch, I was thinking about neutralising combinations. Jab, cross, hook type stuff. I tend to just cover against jabs. Does anyone have advice on sticking to jabs? Theyr'e in and out so fast, bit hard to mini-roll-back...
I managed to setup Block, Parry and Punch when sparring with a friend. I exposed my right and when he sent a one, two combo. I used the Block to deflect his left, Parry to cover his right and slipped the Punch under his guard. Worked well... course it was friendly sparring and a setup.
Has anyone got specific tactics for flurries or combinations?

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J HepworthYoung
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Re: Taijiquan against common attacks

Post by J HepworthYoung » Sat Mar 24, 2012 9:55 am

I have a few things I use against flurries and combination attacks in practice.

It always depends on the attack, I do not use formulaic counters, however I do use several patterns in a "listening" manner.

Unfortunately I am not sure I can describe the patterns well.

I will say that one of my own "teachings" is that if an opponent is strong "up top" meaning they have a strong or formidable attack/defense above their waist then I attack low such as with a strike/kick to the top of the foot, ankle or knee. It is like Chess in a way. I often assume postures that allow me to strike up top or kick below and just wait for my opponent to move, if they attack up top I arrive below, if they attack below I arrive up top.

I have on occasion found that the person I was playing with was simply too strong in their attack for me to try and neutralize it. This is why if they are really strong "up top" I attack their legs at the weak spots.

Jabs can be a pain, I am pretty fast and can often go right through a guard and hit before they can react or adjust, one must both learn to keep an advantageous position/structure as well as to be able to take a jab, or a few, without losing composure.

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