taijiquan and dim-mak

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J HepworthYoung
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taijiquan and dim-mak

Post by J HepworthYoung » Mon Nov 21, 2011 1:16 pm

I was taught some lethal applications, but was not taught that taijiquan specifically contains or pertains to 'dim-mak', which is often interpreted incorrectly to mean 'death touch'

So i am looking for evidence that 'dim-mak' was part of the original content of the art of the Chens and or the Yangs.

Perhaps the line of teaching that I was initiated into is incomplete, for while it has a great many teachings and lethal applications, there is no emphasis upon the use of 'dim-mak'.

How historically accurate is the claim that Taijiquan is based upon Dim-Mak?

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Re: taijiquan and dim-mak

Post by Scott M. Rodell » Tue Jan 24, 2012 9:39 am

J HepworthYoung wrote:I was taught some lethal applications, but was not taught that taijiquan specifically contains or pertains to 'dim-mak', which is often interpreted incorrectly to mean 'death touch'
In my experience that is incorrect. When I was studying with Wang Yen-nien, he would sometimes point out which striking point to use for a particular application. If you are familiar with striking points, you will see that the form is aiming at them.
J HepworthYoung wrote:... looking for evidence that 'dim-mak' was part of the original content of the art of the Chens and or the Yangs.
There is no direct, primarily source that either supports this idea or that negates it. But then again, we wouldn't really expect there to be. In my experience, these were not the kinds of things that were written down. Rather they were passed directly, teacher to student via the teacher actually pressing the points on the students body.
J HepworthYoung wrote:Perhaps the line of teaching that I was initiated into is incomplete, for while it has a great many teachings and lethal applications, there is no emphasis upon the use of 'dim-mak'.
I am afraid that could be true. Much has been lost as the modern world of guns replaced traditional martial arts. The world is a very different place since Yang Luchan instructed the Shenji Ying in Beijing.
J HepworthYoung wrote:How historically accurate is the claim that Taijiquan is based upon Dim-Mak?
I believe it would be fair to say that taijiquan does not focus on using point striking, but that it incorporates a practical amount of point striking. Also, as a student progresses, the target he or she is aiming for gets smaller, i.e. his or her intent is more focused. In other words, a beginner, might simply aim at striking the chest with his or her palm. An intermediate student might aim at the heart. And the seasoned student, might aim at the most effective striking point. Given that few even practice sanshou or have learned how to properly strike with any portion of the hand, one can not expect the knowledge of striking points or how to use them has been passed on much with in taijiquan (or most other arts for that matter). It's not difficulty to see how the chain of knowledge can be easily broken.

BTW, dim mak is Cantonese, in Mandarin it is dianxue.

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J HepworthYoung
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Re: taijiquan and dim-mak

Post by J HepworthYoung » Tue Jan 31, 2012 6:04 pm

Thank you for the informative reply.

I am aware that dim-mak is Cantonese, but was using the language of a specific style, which claims to teach "dim mak katas" from Wudang mountain. Despite kata being a Japanese term, Wudang being a Mandarin region and dim mak being a Cantonese term.

:roll:

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Re: taijiquan and dim-mak

Post by KungFuPanda1979 » Wed Feb 01, 2012 3:40 pm

Scott M. Rodell wrote:
BTW, dim mak is Cantonese, in Mandarin it is dianxue.
Hi folks,
The straight translation from cantonese to mandarin of dim mak, would be Dian Mai, as the word Mak/Mai refers to the channel, while the word Xue (or Yu in Cantonese) refers to a specific point.

Cheers
The Panda

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Re: taijiquan and dim-mak

Post by Tony Mosen » Sat Dec 22, 2012 8:43 am

The Dragon Society' has researched and teached a system of applied science in relation to Dimak-pressure point applications that is very complete in a systematic way of learning and is related to the 5 elements theory at the basic level, their science can be incorperated into any fighting system.

Their research has led them to beleave that any martial application has (or once was) a corosponding attack on a pressure point.

The advanced instructors take this science to a very high level of application in both the (destructive cycle) and (healing cycle) that is to say they train the knowledge in a practical way and can reverse any harmful effects of their strikes on the opponent depending on how many elements have been applied in a combination, of course the combinations have known effects on the nervous system and most are predictable in nature if you stick to the applied science that they teach but there are uncertain factors or unreversable injuries once certain combonations of points and channels have been used, such as the infamous (death strikes) or combos that will maime someone permanantly, of course you will have to dedicate 20 yrs or so to their training before you aquire that level of expertise but it is all there, however not realy necessesary to know anyway.

In my opinion their research and training is under rated in the martial arts world and anyone who gets the opportunity to train with one of their instructors is in for a treat that will change the way you 'think' about martial arts for ever.

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