miao dao grip and technique

Discussion of Chinese historical swordsmanship from all styles.

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ynze
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miao dao grip and technique

Post by ynze » Fri Jan 13, 2012 8:22 am

I have a question that was raised in our training group a while ago. Our group consists of people from all kinds of disciplines, but all train practical swordplay.

How does one hold the miao dao properly and which hand is leading.
From the japanese disciplines we know that the left hand is the lower hand and that it is the actual hand wealding the weapon. The right hand stears.
Is this common for the miao dao?????

Scott M. Rodell
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Re: miao dao grip and technique

Post by Scott M. Rodell » Fri Mar 09, 2012 8:50 am

ynze wrote:I have a question..

How does one hold the miao dao properly and which hand is leading?
From the japanese disciplines... the left hand is the lower hand and that it is the actual hand wealding the weapon. The right hand stears.
Is this common for the miaodao?
I am not familiar with any miaodao teacher who uses the type of technique you mentioned. But to be honest, this tradition has not been as well preserved in China as the Japanese practice has, so who knows what might have been lost. In my experience, all Chinese swordsmanship is influenced in the body mechanics of the art that it is being presented by. In other words, a taijiquan practitioners will use different body mechanics than say a xingyiquan or Northern Shaolinquan practitioner, to deliver the same technique. Accordingly, when I wield my miaodao, I use the two-hands working together in the same fashion I do when practicing taijiquan, that is, both hands are always working together. Depending on what cut I am employing, the hands might both be exerting force in the same or similar direction, such as when cutting downward with a heavy kan (chipping) cut. Or, in the case of a cut like Heng Pi (Level Split), they move in opposite directions as they would when applying lieh (split) in empty hand.

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