question reg. the PUSH

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Alberto
Rank: Yang Chenfu
Rank: Yang Chenfu
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question reg. the PUSH

Post by Alberto » Tue Feb 17, 2004 1:17 am

Hi lao shr,



dont u remember our training session when we practice pushing partner along the gym - back leg push and then half step and push again :?:



i started to work with beginner students this way and found they are pushing off the ground rather than from the root. i am sure u can imagine how it feels. what woud be your advice on correcting this and developing right attitude towards the push?



:roll: regards



albert

Scott M. Rodell
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Re: question reg. the PUSH

Post by Scott M. Rodell » Fri Feb 20, 2004 9:19 am

Alberto wrote:...remember our training session when we practice pushing partner along the gym - back leg push and then half step and push again...?
You are describing a common problem for beginners. Indeed, the most simple, physical type of fajin is much like the springy way we use our bodies when jumping. The only difference is that instead of using this power to jump up, we send this jolt thru the body. So we have to learn how to let our body be a good conduit for this power. This is a new skill to master, so everyone should take their time learning.



The most important thing for beginners to understand when they begin working on how to fajin is: proper technique is far more important than how much power you have or how far you push anyone. If the technique is correct & thus the understanding is good, then power will come naturally & easily. If one simply shoves with the arms, over & over, one will make no progress & just feel tired after practice.



Also you can instruct the partner being pushed to not resist at all & be a little stiff, in other words, not to do good taijiquan. In this way its very easy to push them. When its easy to push, the student practicing will concentrate more on proper technique & less on trying to look good by pushing their partner a long way. Instruct them that its not a contest, they should help each other bring the energy out.



Have your new students use as little power as possible & just push their parnter a meter or less. You all have that big gym to train in, lots of space. It may make beginners feel like they have to use big pushes when its their turn. Plus they see older students, like you, giving the juniors "flying lessons".



Best of Luck, Looking forward to seeing you all again in June...

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Lifting the Front Toe

Post by Scott M. Rodell » Mon Feb 23, 2004 9:34 am

I forgot to mention one of the most basic structural points: you should have your students, lift the front toe when pushing. This will help to keep them firmly on their feet while helping guide the energy up & out. Wang Laoshi explained that in the beginning, students should lift the heel up quite high. As one progresses, you lift it less & less, until it's barely off the ground &. in fact, while its not touching, some one looking the heel can not see its off the ground.

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