Yangjia Michuan Kao (Shoulder Strike) Movement

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Scott M. Rodell
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Yangjia Michuan Kao (Shoulder Strike) Movement

Post by Scott M. Rodell » Tue Feb 15, 2005 11:16 am

In my travels I've noticed that there are a number of 'interesting' variations of the 'proper' way to employ the kao movement from the Michuan form. Naturally everyone is performing the movement in the method they believe is correct, but since there is only one correct method, most are apparently doing this movement incorrectly. Kao is a very powerful movement that hits like a sledge hammer when preformed correctly. Honestly, I'm sure that there would be a lot less difference of opinion amongst classmates if more attention was paid to application (see the thread: Taijiquan for Health... on the General Taiji Board). Below I've attached a photo of Master Wang teaching at a seminar in Washington, DC where he is adjusting my posture & explaining the fine points of kao. I will list these fine points below.
Last edited by Scott M. Rodell on Fri Feb 18, 2005 7:32 am, edited 1 time in total.

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Photo of Kao Movement

Post by Scott M. Rodell » Tue Feb 15, 2005 11:37 am

Master Wang Yen-nien adjusting Scott M. Rodell's Shoulder Strike Movement.

Image

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Fine Points of Shoulder Strike.

Post by Scott M. Rodell » Fri Feb 18, 2005 7:51 am

Fine Points of Alignment for the Kao Movement from the Yangjia Michuan Taijiquan form:



From the previous movement, Elbow Strike, the power continues to spring out of the rear leg & the torso inclines forward so that the spine & rear leg are on the same straight line, parrallel to each other. When one is in the correct postion, one can rest one's rear arm straight down one side over the hip on to the thigh. Do not bend forward so that there is a bend forward at the waist. Do not shift the hips backwards as the shoulder moves forward.



Do not turn the waist as you are moving forward from the Elbow Strike into Shoulder Strike. If, when using power, one turns the waist as one is moving forward during the fajin one will lose balance as one is directing the weight to the side instead of the root & the shoulder will be turning as it hits instead of hitting straight on.



The movement should end with the shoulder, the front knee & front toes aligned in a vertical plumb line. Moving past this point will cause one to lose blance forward & be prone to a pull from one's duifang. Moving less than this will mean that one did not bring out all the energy possible.



While your entire body is shifting forward when employing kao, the front foot does not become heavy. This is because the fajin comes primarily from the rear leg as the front heel rises to help stabilize the body & direct the power outward. Also one does not linger in the posture. As soon as the shoulder has struck, one shifts the weight 100% into the front foot for a push or palm strike as needed as the torso is straighten upright (just as in the form).



I hope the above photo & these details are helpful to all.

vincenzo
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Re: Fine Points of Shoulder Strike.

Post by vincenzo » Sat Feb 19, 2005 5:15 am

Scott M. Rodell wrote:Fine Points of Alignment for the Kao Movement from the Yangjia Michuan Taijiquan form:



As soon as the shoulder has struck, one shifts the weight 100% into the front foot for a push or palm strike as needed as the torso is straighten upright (just as in the form).


At this point the front heel should be up or down?

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RE: vincenzo's question concerning kao

Post by Scott M. Rodell » Mon Feb 21, 2005 10:26 am

Thanks for your question v.



As soon as the kao fajin is completed & you begin shifting your weight forward onto the front foot, the heel starts going down flat. You should only begin the follow up tui (push) fajin once your foot is flat on the ground.

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