TCFE European Taiji chamiponship---Results of Estonians

Annoucements about GRTC: seminars, lectures, and special events

Moderator: Scott M. Rodell

Post Reply
Marko Kohv
Rank: Wang Yen-nien
Rank: Wang Yen-nien
Posts: 50
Joined: Fri Aug 27, 2004 8:50 am
Location: Tartu, Estonia

TCFE European Taiji chamiponship---Results of Estonians

Post by Marko Kohv » Mon Nov 08, 2004 9:11 am

Estonians won 3 medals :D



Renata silver and bronze (restricted and moving step PH)



Lauri bronze (restricted step PH)



Kaido and Roland 4. place (moving step PH)



All the results are available http://iari.ru/champion/entrform.html



Roland promised longer overview sometime soon





Marko

Scott M. Rodell
Site Admin
Site Admin
Posts: 1364
Joined: Wed Jan 28, 2004 4:50 pm
Location: Virginia
Contact:

Congratulations!

Post by Scott M. Rodell » Tue Nov 09, 2004 9:02 am

Great job everyone, its the fruit of your deligent training. Rest a week then go over all your matches & find your mistakes & work on moving forward even further!



See you all in April...

Scott M. Rodell
Site Admin
Site Admin
Posts: 1364
Joined: Wed Jan 28, 2004 4:50 pm
Location: Virginia
Contact:

Serviti serviti Kalevipoeg!

Post by Scott M. Rodell » Tue Nov 09, 2004 2:42 pm

I forgot to mention that I heard from Albert at our Moscow Branch that, his student, Dima, won bronze in fixed and free

steps push hands (out of 15 players).



ps- Serviti serviti Kalevipoeg!

Roland Tepp
Rank: Chang San feng
Rank: Chang San feng
Posts: 107
Joined: Wed Jan 28, 2004 5:34 pm
Location: Tallinn, Estonia
Contact:

My impressions of the tournament

Post by Roland Tepp » Wed Nov 10, 2004 11:04 am

First of all I want to point out that this is more or less my personal account of the tournament. Other participants might have had different experience and lessons, so please dont take it as Unified Voice of the Estonian Team :wink:



As Marko wrote before - we had some really great results on those turnaments - specially Lauri, who won bronze in restricted step Push-hands in by all means the largest weight category of the competition.



Also the St. Petersburg is really beautiful city and those of us who had a chance to come earlier had some time to explore this great city of the once great imerium...



On the downside - the tournament organization was at best chaotic. There were occational mixups with weight categories, Constant lagging of the individual competitions and the fact that nobody seemed to know anything was sometimes frustrsating, but mostly mind-numbing.



There was no doctor - just a lady in a green dress who openly admitted that she knows notng of the medicine and who had some reserve of bandages and ice (Marko had a rather serious injury on his first match, when he fell on his shoulder and one of the contestants pulled his shoulder back into the joint)



Anyway - as frustrating and chaoic as the tournament organisation was, it was still quite a good experience for those of us who participated. Although Laoshr did warn us against the kind of push-hands we might encounter on the tournament and at least theoretically i was ready for that, there is still a distinct difference between knowing what is going on and actually realizing it in the ring. :wink:



Quite frankly (and expectedly) - I got beaten. Badly beaten:)

After the very first match I realized that I was no match in that kind of bulldozer-style pushing that seemed to be the dominating style of the tournament. I tried for couple of times to answer with the same agressive buldozer technique, but soon enough I quit doing that since the only result of that approach was that I was wasting lot of my energy on something that did not work for me.

After the second match I resolved to just doing the best taiji I could remember in the ring (which was not so good, I must admit). My reasoning being that if I lose or win, it has to have something to do with my taiji skill (or lack thereof), not my strength or speed. This strategy seemed to start paying off on my few last matches, where I started to have little more control over myself and even managed to pull few really nice rollback-type-of-things :wink:.



Anyway - I liked the experience - it taught me a lot about my mistakes (which I had in abundance) and showed me where I fail most critically.



A good point from a contestant was that it is good to participate in these tournaments, because Your fellow classmate, trying to do "good taiji", will propably never exploit your every weakness in a way an opponent on the tournament will. The classmate will usually not try to "get you, what ever it takes".



A related thought is that whenever we practice applications or do pair-work, the one who is feeding should watch that he/she is not decieving the duifang by gently going along in whatever direction the duifang rolls off or pulls the attacker, thus giving a false impression to the duifang that his technique is perfect when in reality it is not.
Roland

Alberto
Rank: Yang Chenfu
Rank: Yang Chenfu
Posts: 40
Joined: Wed Jan 28, 2004 5:16 pm
Location: moscow

some more

Post by Alberto » Tue Nov 16, 2004 4:27 am

estonians did really great and specially i referred some of their matches. :D no cheating :D



i am glad to meet Roland Tepp at least virtually whom i called so many times with no result for the matches.



just briefly to answer the Q. on the use of the competitions. in male's fight won people with very good gong-fu but not necessary taiji background. dont test your taiji there in term of technique. test your gong-fu!

Dante
Rank: Yang Chenfu
Rank: Yang Chenfu
Posts: 31
Joined: Wed Jan 28, 2004 5:22 pm

Post by Dante » Wed Nov 17, 2004 2:58 pm

Albert, what do you mean test your gong fu instead of your taijiquan technique? What's the difference?

Alberto
Rank: Yang Chenfu
Rank: Yang Chenfu
Posts: 40
Joined: Wed Jan 28, 2004 5:16 pm
Location: moscow

easy

Post by Alberto » Fri Nov 19, 2004 4:32 am

at the championship u can meet all sorts of folks, even these who never do taiji but other martial arts. so u have to test not only how u follow taiji principles but ur general fighting condition and spirit. i so people who were just lost against 'hard'-style opponents.

so. sometimes u dont show much yelding but show good root, sometimes you use hard force witn right timing to throw the opponent. it is all general test, not just taiji. i hope it clarifyies

Post Reply

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 1 guest