Chipped blade

How to restore antique arms & repair practice swords.

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tatsu
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Chipped blade

Post by tatsu » Mon May 28, 2007 2:17 am

I've somehow managed to get a small chip, probably about 0.5 mm indentation, in my blade and was wondering if there was anyway I could fix it? I've been told that either heating the blade to expand the metal or using sandpaper to file it out would be fine, but i'd like a more professional option if anyone has one here...?

Many thanks

Tatsu

Scott M. Rodell
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Field Sharpening Swords

Post by Scott M. Rodell » Mon May 28, 2007 10:07 am

See the thread:

Field Sharpening Swords
viewtopic.php?t=331

I think you will find it useful...

Philip Tom
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Post by Philip Tom » Fri Jun 01, 2007 12:54 am

Applying heat to the blade is no way to fix a nick or notch in the edge as you describe. Please avoid such a remedy -- applying heat in this fashion to any part of the blade is likely to alter the crystalline structure of the metal, essentially draining away its hardness. The result being that the sword will no longer hold an edge well in the area and/or lose its resilience so that it will bend easily.

Scott's suggestion to an accompanying thread is the first step you should take.

If you use your blade for cutting, its is advisable to grind and polish the nick out. This sort of damage can provide a focus for lateral stresses on the blade, possibly leading to more serious damage such as cracking of the "jen" or hardened edge zone if serious flexing should occur in a subsequent cut.

In the old days, when the weapons were in active service, swordsmen were careful to remove the nicks whenever possible. Ideally, a professional sword smith or cutler would expertly grind the entire edge back to maintain the original contour. Using whetstones to remove the nick just in its immediate area tends to leave a slight indentation in the contour. That is why so many old blades which have seen hard use have irregular edges -- people in a hurry would just keep sharpening in the damaged area to smooth out the edge, and not bring the entire profile into proper shape. From a functional standpoint, this approach is not a fatal deficiency, but a connoisseur who likes the aesthetics of swords will cringe at the sight!

Remember that even a blade that has seen its share of battles does not have to get all "chewed up" during its lifetime. Ideally, a swordsman who knows how to parry will use the flat or the spine of the blade, not the edge, to block an opponent. Edge nicks would be more of an accidental occurrence, not a matter of course.
Phil

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Post by Scott M. Rodell » Fri Jun 01, 2007 8:31 am

Philip Tom wrote:... even a blade that has seen its share of battles does not have to get all "chewed up"... a swordsman who knows how to parry will use the flat or the spine of the blade...
Having handled a fair number of antque blades that were "users," I would have to second Philip's suggestion. While they often show a fair bit of combat damage, the edges are by-in-large intact & serviceable.

tatsu
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Post by tatsu » Tue Jul 03, 2007 2:14 am

Philip Tom wrote: Edge nicks would be more of an accidental occurrence, not a matter of course.
That's essentially it, i don't really use my jian for cutting practice, so i've picked up a couple of small nicks from incidental use, just general sticky swords (i think) or in demonstrating parries and the like.

Thanks very much for the help, will try and file it out :)

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