Search found 339 matches

by josh stout
Thu Mar 19, 2009 3:47 pm
Forum: Chinese Historical Arms
Topic: Historical sheath designs
Replies: 9
Views: 5492

Re: Historical sheath designs

The wrapping was under spots where lacquer had flaked of a few antiques I have seen.
Josh
by josh stout
Thu Mar 19, 2009 8:56 am
Forum: Chinese Historical Arms
Topic: Historical sheath designs
Replies: 9
Views: 5492

Re: Historical sheath designs

I have not tried to make something like this, but some of the lacquered scabbards are relatively nice looking and fairly simple. They use an average quality wood wrapped in a cotton mesh. It looks like a thin cotton bandage wrapping would be similar. Then the cotton is covered over with some sort of...
by josh stout
Wed Feb 25, 2009 10:38 am
Forum: Chinese Historical Arms
Topic: Good Documentary
Replies: 8
Views: 5012

Re: Good Documentary

A human body may be difficult to swing, have very little throwing range, and no penetrating power against even the lightest armor, but they do have heir uses. Launched in catapults they have been instrumental in spreading plague. :D
Josh
by josh stout
Wed Feb 11, 2009 9:44 am
Forum: Chinese Historical Arms
Topic: Military use of the 2-handed jian?
Replies: 15
Views: 10940

Re: Military use of the 2-handed jian?

When it comes to jian, there were no regulations so there are many variations, especially in the village made weapons. The majority as Peter said were short choppers, but some had thin blades with no taper, while others had blades as triangular as the museum example shown. I have one late chang jian...
by josh stout
Wed Feb 11, 2009 9:28 am
Forum: Chinese Historical Arms
Topic: recommended for your library
Replies: 6
Views: 4127

Re: recommended for your library

I am looking forward to reading the Ming accounts. From Qing accounts of the interplay between scholarly and martial society I had the impression that while martial culture was appreciated in an abstract sense, and as part of the training for examinations, it was generally considered that too much m...
by josh stout
Wed Feb 11, 2009 9:05 am
Forum: Chinese Historical Arms
Topic: Unusual Edge on Jian
Replies: 2
Views: 2470

Re: Unusual Edge on Jian

I have seen the same thing as Peter. Sometimes it is due to many historical polishings, and sometimes a bad modern polish to hide battle damage. Occasionally I have seen a village made jian where the tip is slightly spatulate, flattened and widened compared to the rest of the blade. It is usually su...
by josh stout
Sat Jan 17, 2009 6:49 pm
Forum: Chinese Historical Arms
Topic: Unusual Stencil on Dao
Replies: 6
Views: 4447

If you want to etch and not harm a brass design, you put a little clear nail polish over the brass to protect it from the acid. I have done this very successfully with brass stars, but thin lines will be a bit more difficult. You have to make sure the design is covered completely so acid does not ge...
by josh stout
Thu Dec 18, 2008 2:02 pm
Forum: Chinese Historical Arms
Topic: Sword Restoration - Before and After
Replies: 3
Views: 3406

Also a blade that has been badly polished can look good in a photo, but you can feel the blade getting thinner and thicker if you run your fingers along it. This would mean that a good polish to restore the blade geometry would end up taking too much.
Josh
by josh stout
Fri Nov 07, 2008 1:29 pm
Forum: Chinese Historical Arms
Topic: Crossguards
Replies: 16
Views: 12904

The general shape of Tang sabers has been retained by Tibetan style sabers; however, the Tibetan ke tri typically has a small guard. Recently zheibeidao coming out of Qinghai province have been turning up with a guardless form that seems closer to the original Tang period style. http://i77.photobuck...
by josh stout
Thu Nov 06, 2008 12:40 pm
Forum: Chinese Historical Arms
Topic: Crossguards
Replies: 16
Views: 12904

I often think about the difference in guards between jian and dao. Jian are civilian weapons, and many styles seem to have movements designed to be used in tight quarters fighting a mob. In these cases the jian can be used in a backhand grip, or with the blade close to the body. These grips are poss...
by josh stout
Tue Jul 29, 2008 11:24 am
Forum: Chinese Historical Arms
Topic: Swords of the Qianlong Emperor
Replies: 13
Views: 16388

Is anyone familiar with the later (19th c.) hilts that are somewhat similar to the Mogul styles, but with more of a right angle hook like a shamshir? I have seen this on village made weapons with wood or horn handle scales, and a small metal cap at the end. It does not appear to be a traditional Chi...
by josh stout
Tue Jun 17, 2008 11:48 am
Forum: Chinese Historical Arms
Topic: Of geese and willows: comparison of yanmaodao and liuyedao
Replies: 20
Views: 34742

I have often wondered about the handling of piandao. They are often compared to a shamsher or a tulwar, but I am not sure to what extent that is true. I have one somewhat thin 18th c. tulwar and a village pian dao, and if they are anything like typical, I would not say they are the same. The piandao...
by josh stout
Tue May 27, 2008 12:04 pm
Forum: Chinese Historical Arms
Topic: Bronze Swords - Real or Fake?
Replies: 5
Views: 6096

I would just like to add that any antique is more likely to show rounded shapes than modern things. In the case of jades, the Chinese refer to antiques looking like "melted fat", ie. all the lines are rounded without sharp edges to the cuts in the stone. The white jade shown has very sharp edges to ...
by josh stout
Tue May 13, 2008 10:56 am
Forum: Chinese Swordsmanship
Topic: Han Jian questions
Replies: 2
Views: 3251

What exactly do you mean by a "Han jian"? The Han dynasty steel jian blades I have seen are long and thin with a medium "hand and a half" or a large two handed size grip. The reproductions I have seen look more like the wide bladed early Han bronze jian, and would require very different techniques. ...
by josh stout
Mon Mar 31, 2008 10:05 am
Forum: Sword Care & Maintenance
Topic: BASICS Of Day to Day JIAN Maintenance
Replies: 14
Views: 19386

I use it on any wood, particularly if I want the wood to get a bit darker, or there is sun fading. I would hesitate to use it on metal. The extra virgin stuff in particular has acids and other potentially damaging substances. The problem with organic oils in general is they oxidize with time forming...