Search found 339 matches

by josh stout
Tue Feb 02, 2010 1:02 pm
Forum: Chinese Swordsmanship
Topic: Different saber type – different form/technique?
Replies: 2
Views: 2712

Re: Different saber type – different form/technique?

Let me preface my comments by saying that I study a different lineage from that of GRTC, and thus my answers may differ from those within the GRTC lineage. For the most part the changes in form related to changes in blade type are natural results that can be understood from simply trying different b...
by josh stout
Wed Jan 13, 2010 11:25 am
Forum: Chinese Historical Arms
Topic: Comparison of Japanese and Chinese tangs
Replies: 11
Views: 8618

Re: Comparison of Japanese and Chinese tangs

I suspect that Peter is on the right track with differing age estimates being attributable to differing treatment. I have read that as part of the process of polishing Japanese swords, at the end, the polisher wipes his slightly oily fingers on the tang. This goes against the usual understanding tha...
by josh stout
Tue Jan 12, 2010 12:39 pm
Forum: Chinese Historical Arms
Topic: Comparison of Japanese and Chinese tangs
Replies: 11
Views: 8618

Comparison of Japanese and Chinese tangs

I went to the Met to be amazed by the recent exhibit of Japanese swords. If anything, the exhibit exceeded my expectations, but I found my preconceptions of how to date a sword severely challenged. Many people had suggested using a study of Japanese tangs, which are signed and dated, to help develop...
by josh stout
Tue Jan 12, 2010 11:32 am
Forum: Chinese Historical Arms
Topic: A J-sword collector turns to the West
Replies: 9
Views: 6404

Re: A J-sword collector turns to the West

I also have an small interest in Islamic swords, wootz amazes me in its simple beauty. It would not be surprised but very delighted to find a Chinese mounted wootz blade :). Stone shows an example of a Chinese mounted wootz blade, but I would not hold my breath waiting for another. Still, wootz is ...
by josh stout
Sat Sep 19, 2009 10:15 am
Forum: Chinese Historical Arms
Topic: A question of fullers
Replies: 10
Views: 7598

Re: A question of fullers

The widened tip can be seen on mid 19th c. things but I do not think it is diagnostic. The fangshi style pommel is more useful in that they are rarely seen after the 18th c. The exceptions are of course the 20th c. things made in imitation. I would look at the workmanship to tell the difference. Wha...
by josh stout
Fri Sep 18, 2009 11:35 am
Forum: Chinese Historical Arms
Topic: A question of fullers
Replies: 10
Views: 7598

Re: A question of fullers

Why are you dating it as 20th c.? At first glace I would say late 18th to early 19th c..
Josh
by josh stout
Fri Sep 18, 2009 10:54 am
Forum: Chinese Historical Arms
Topic: A question of blade tangs and dating
Replies: 3
Views: 3269

Re: A question of blade tangs and dating

Those are excellent tips on tang construction, but I was wondering about the term "hot punched". I have a chang jian blade (mid to late 19th c.) where a hole started to be made in the normal spot near the bottom of the tang. The hole was not punched or drilled, but chiseled. During this process a sm...
by josh stout
Thu Jul 16, 2009 8:16 am
Forum: Chinese Historical Arms
Topic: Village jian
Replies: 13
Views: 19488

Re: Village jian

I was remembering an old thread about these shuang jian where Peter referred to these faces as lions (http://forum.grtc.org/viewtopic.php?f=15&t=445&p=2196&hilit=shuang+jian#p2196). Because the example he shows is an antique shield, I suspect he meant tiger. Thanks for making me check my assumptions...
by josh stout
Wed Jul 15, 2009 11:45 am
Forum: Chinese Historical Arms
Topic: Village jian
Replies: 13
Views: 19488

Re: Village jian

Yes, it is some kind of tiger/lion face oriented the wrong way. We have discussed this set before, and Nick Wardigo mentioned that the face is oriented in a similar manner to Vietnamese things. The big eyes and nose combined with the trefoil lotus pommel appear to be influenced by Tibetan designs. A...
by josh stout
Tue Jul 14, 2009 8:28 pm
Forum: Chinese Historical Arms
Topic: Village jian
Replies: 13
Views: 19488

Village jian

Phillip Tom suggested I put together some photos showing the diversity of village jian. Here are a few examples, some of which I have posted before, and some of which are new. Josh Village jian with guard useful for blocking, catching and hooking. http://i77.photobucket.com/albums/j65/pekhopai/sword...
by josh stout
Tue Jul 14, 2009 1:52 pm
Forum: Chinese Historical Arms
Topic: Iron Chinese Helmet
Replies: 24
Views: 16790

Re: Iron Chinese Helmet

Congratulations Linda :D The helmet looks much better than the first pictures I saw. When Scott pointed out that it had been cleaned with acid, the color made more sense. When you are done with figuring out the cool dragon designs (definitely part of what I can see) I bet a good oiling (not WD 40) w...
by josh stout
Tue Jul 14, 2009 1:33 pm
Forum: Chinese Historical Arms
Topic: Ming jian
Replies: 7
Views: 6491

Re: Ming jian

When I found it, the tip was rounded, the medial ridge was rounded, and the entire surface of the blade had small ripples where it had been put on something like a belt sander to "clean it up". I had classed it as late 19th c.- early 20th c. and put it in my display of village jian at Timonium. Phil...
by josh stout
Tue Jul 14, 2009 12:44 pm
Forum: Chinese Historical Arms
Topic: Ming jian
Replies: 7
Views: 6491

Ming jian

This recently came back from Phillip Tom. He spotted it as part of my display at Timonium, and thinks it may be a genuine Ming blade with mid 19th C. village fittings. The blade is of a type thought to be the origin of the Vietnamese kiem. Josh http://i77.photobucket.com/albums/j65/pekhopai/MJ-01ove...
by josh stout
Thu Jul 02, 2009 10:20 am
Forum: Chinese Swordsmanship
Topic: Development of swords for chinese swordmanship
Replies: 49
Views: 43491

Re: Development of swords for chinese swordmanship

Sorry to jump in so late on the thread, but I wanted to mention that the top jian you show with the lighter fittings seems the most historically acurate. I like the idea of blunt steel for practice. It is true that nothing concentrates the mind like a sharp edge, but it is not as if you would want t...