Search found 30 matches

by David R
Sun Sep 11, 2011 7:53 am
Forum: Chinese Historical Arms
Topic: Village jian
Replies: 13
Views: 19981

Re: Village jian

Many thanks to Mr Stout for producing this brilliant resource.
by David R
Tue Jul 05, 2011 6:23 pm
Forum: Chinese Historical Arms
Topic: Butterfly swords/knives
Replies: 14
Views: 17730

Re: Butterfly swords/knives

I have been able to handle a fairly representative selection of original basket hilts, not just Scottish, but Sciavonas and Sinclaires, also mortury hilts, and 18thC grenadier hangers which are also basket hilts, they are all tight to the hand. Modern replicas are much larger than the originals, whi...
by David R
Sun Jun 19, 2011 9:27 am
Forum: Chinese Historical Arms
Topic: Butterfly swords/knives
Replies: 14
Views: 17730

Re: Butterfly swords/knives

Hi everyone, long time no posting. Re the pics I posted of D guard blades, I downloaded them from chinesearms.com for my own files, and posted them as relevant to the discussion. I have no idea of their balance or handling characteristics, or the style of use they were intended for. I was and am pri...
by David R
Wed Apr 20, 2011 6:01 pm
Forum: Chinese Swordsmanship
Topic: Period Chinese Armor
Replies: 35
Views: 48865

Re: Period Chinese Armor

I just thought I would post a couple of pictures, late 13thC from the Maciejowski Bible, showing 2 gambesons worn at once, with a painted metal helmet on the head. These guys in my opinion, are not peasants but pro foot soldiers, possibly even sergeants, ie foot or light horse holding land as fee fo...
by David R
Mon Apr 18, 2011 10:14 am
Forum: Chinese Swordsmanship
Topic: Period Chinese Armor
Replies: 35
Views: 48865

Re: Period Chinese Armor

Here we come to what is largely a question of function rather than construction. In the West what went under the armour after 1100 was either an arming doublet, or a gambeson -haqueton-wambaise... All these latter being different spellings of the same word. The Gambeson seems to have been little dif...
by David R
Mon Apr 18, 2011 7:49 am
Forum: Chinese Swordsmanship
Topic: Period Chinese Armor
Replies: 35
Views: 48865

Re: Period Chinese Armor

During a test shoot against mail, some years ago with a variety of arrows, they found that mail over padding was regularly penetrated by by bodkins. Then while trying out other options they found that putting the padding over the mail greatly increased it's resistance way beyond the other options, p...
by David R
Tue Apr 12, 2011 3:05 pm
Forum: Chinese Swordsmanship
Topic: Period Chinese Armor
Replies: 35
Views: 48865

Re: Period Chinese Armor

Just done a day of data inputting at the Armouries, so I am not going to be long on this. I went and had a look at a some of the Chinese armour in the reserve collection, one piece fairly early ie 17th or early 18th C, and others later, 19th C. The early pieces were under arm gussets, rather like Ja...
by David R
Mon Apr 11, 2011 4:55 pm
Forum: Chinese Swordsmanship
Topic: Period Chinese Armor
Replies: 35
Views: 48865

Re: Period Chinese Armor

A note: I don't do "test cutting". Our school does not practice it because, in virtually every instance one can see, the desire for a clean cut overrides the importance of an accurate cut. In german swordsmanship, you do not perform the big cuts that go down to the ground. (There is a time- the Wec...
by David R
Mon Apr 11, 2011 2:01 pm
Forum: Chinese Swordsmanship
Topic: Period Chinese Armor
Replies: 35
Views: 48865

Re: Period Chinese Armor

Sorry for the image heavy posts, but at a certain point, one picture is worth.....These pics are of a couple of the few surviving Euro Jacks, and are of the wadded cotton wool layered with woven textile type. As you can see the are homongousley thick, but as a contemperary illustration shows they ar...
by David R
Mon Apr 11, 2011 1:47 pm
Forum: Chinese Swordsmanship
Topic: Period Chinese Armor
Replies: 35
Views: 48865

Re: Period Chinese Armor

A North African, Sudanese layered fabric armour, the one I axamined up close, (handled) was little more if any thicker than 1cm thick, and was made as serious use armour.
by David R
Mon Apr 11, 2011 1:41 pm
Forum: Chinese Swordsmanship
Topic: Period Chinese Armor
Replies: 35
Views: 48865

Re: Period Chinese Armor

These are Indian coats of ten thousand nails. They can be of either construction, wadded cotton wool, or layered woven textile. Pieces like the shoulder guards can have a wooden lath incorporated to give rigidity.
by David R
Mon Apr 11, 2011 1:33 pm
Forum: Chinese Swordsmanship
Topic: Period Chinese Armor
Replies: 35
Views: 48865

Re: Period Chinese Armor

This garment is a Coat Armour, or a Jupon and current thinking is that this and the other surviving examples were light armours, most likely worn over mail body armour. They appear in "low threat level" situations, and the Italian knights seemed to like them as shipboard armour where you would get a...
by David R
Sun Apr 03, 2011 9:33 am
Forum: Chinese Swordsmanship
Topic: Period Chinese Armor
Replies: 35
Views: 48865

Re: Period Chinese Armor

Textile armour part 2. Sorry to be gone so long, life catches up and needs to be dealt with sometimes. The other type of textile armour you see a lot of is the multiple layers of woven textile type. This was used in Western Europe, India, North Africa and Pre Columbian America and probably anywhere ...
by David R
Tue Mar 29, 2011 3:44 pm
Forum: Chinese Historical Arms
Topic: Dao
Replies: 16
Views: 18810

Re: Dao

Today I took my Dao into the Royal Armouries, where it was given a once over by a couple of the curators. They think the mounts are all original, which is nice in one way, but leaves me no excuse now to replace the guard which to me looks somewhat flimsy and poorly fitted. Ah well, just got to finis...
by David R
Thu Mar 24, 2011 5:45 pm
Forum: Chinese Historical Arms
Topic: Butterfly swords/knives
Replies: 14
Views: 17730

Re: Butterfly swords/knives

Sorry , the pics are a little mixed up, hope you can make sense of them. Btw, more on the textile armour later, I am running a little ragged at the moment.