Search found 17 matches

by PaulC
Mon Sep 29, 2008 7:59 pm
Forum: Chinese Swordsmanship
Topic: Chinese Jian Blade Construction
Replies: 3
Views: 4193

There doesn't seem to be just one way it was done, some I have examined have a softer or at least lower carbon plates on either side of the core, I have tested one where the outside plates have a higher carbon content in relation to the core/edge. This makes sense when you realize the span of time b...
by PaulC
Wed Mar 12, 2008 8:04 pm
Forum: Chinese Historical Arms
Topic: How San Mai Blades are Made?
Replies: 1
Views: 3238

San mai ( 3 pieces) is a construction method. This means it is how the metal is arranged in the billet ( starting rectangular block of steel that is welded together) before the sword is forged to shape. The basic idea is to have a central steel piece in the middle and a different steel/iron on the t...
by PaulC
Tue Aug 28, 2007 2:55 pm
Forum: Test Cutting for Historical Swordsmanship
Topic: Cutting Planes of blades
Replies: 18
Views: 19699

I'm not sure that Katana or any other type of blade actually cuts more efficiently presenting the blade to the target in this manner. Upon impact this method would twist the sword in the hand(s) and present a much larger surface area to the target causing a huge amount of material to compress ahead ...
by PaulC
Wed Aug 01, 2007 9:55 am
Forum: Chinese Swordsmanship
Topic: Blocking with Jians and Daos
Replies: 12
Views: 8057

It’s nice to see that good information is getting out there on the hazards of hard blocking edge on edge. I have conducted numerous tests over the years to see how edge damage affects blade life. To summarize – any large chip, cut into the edge will cause a MUCH greater chance of catastrophic failur...
by PaulC
Fri Jul 20, 2007 6:55 am
Forum: Chinese Historical Arms
Topic: heat treatment, annealing, and tempering
Replies: 4
Views: 5355

Much of the confusion is a matter of definition. Temper: Noun -the degree of hardness and elasticity in steel or other metal. Verb - improve the temper of (a metal) by reheating and then cooling it. This definition as a noun doesn’t imply the process of tempering which is what you are talking about....
by PaulC
Tue Nov 07, 2006 10:51 pm
Forum: Test Cutting for Historical Swordsmanship
Topic: Cleaning Swords Used For Test Cutting Practice
Replies: 7
Views: 10431

Another compound I found very useful to use on modern steel- high polished swords is Simichrome. put a few very small dabs of this on each side of the blade; carefully wipe it around with paper towel, working a bit more in the spots with staining (be careful of those edges! use a glove) then wipe th...
by PaulC
Mon Oct 23, 2006 7:56 am
Forum: Test Cutting for Historical Swordsmanship
Topic: Test Cutting Assumptions
Replies: 24
Views: 28797

Josh -



Its more difficult for a sword to bend against the hardened edge, but it can happen. You can see this on historical examples from many different cultures. If a sword bent against the edge on soft target cutting it was a very soft sword.
by PaulC
Mon Oct 09, 2006 8:41 pm
Forum: Sword Care & Maintenance
Topic: Field Sharpening Swords
Replies: 6
Views: 14725

Hi Linda, I'm glad you liked the introduction to field sharpening. the file I used was a single cut.. I think. you dont really need a rough double cut, but its not critical. the file technique will work on all but the very hardest edges. Good call about filing out the damage, it doesnt do any good b...
by PaulC
Mon Oct 09, 2006 7:10 pm
Forum: Test Cutting for Historical Swordsmanship
Topic: Edge Sharpness Vs. Application
Replies: 21
Views: 66365

Hi Scott, A very sharp edge, say in the 8-10 range, is best toward the tip of a sword, or on a low mass type of weapon. The tip, being the thinnest part of most swords, lends itself to being sharpened with a finer edge. Striking with the tip will not be used for penetrating cuts on hard targets, thu...
by PaulC
Thu Oct 05, 2006 3:12 pm
Forum: Test Cutting for Historical Swordsmanship
Topic: mono vs. sanmai, spring vs. differential
Replies: 8
Views: 14295

I'm going to start with a simple and short answer to your question, then I will follow with more detail to show how it may not be so simple to answer -short and simply. the simple Using the same steel for the construction method, making the blades to the same dimensions and tempering to the same har...
by PaulC
Sat Jun 10, 2006 7:47 am
Forum: Test Cutting for Historical Swordsmanship
Topic: controversial test cutting
Replies: 4
Views: 9289

The knowledge gained from cutting real meat and bone is not something most swordsmen will ever experience. so sharing the details for those that cannot is important to continuing and understanding the historical use of a sword. From a safety standpoint- A sword needs to be tested in an incremental a...
by PaulC
Tue May 23, 2006 8:56 am
Forum: Test Cutting for Historical Swordsmanship
Topic: Making a cutting stand
Replies: 7
Views: 12725

Well ? there are a couple ways to look at cutting with a ? not so sharp? sword. Combat perspective: A blade that is not razor sharp, a blade that will not even cut your thumb when you slide it down the edge will still perform very well in a combat situation. Historically, against any type of armor, ...
by PaulC
Fri Apr 21, 2006 9:16 am
Forum: Test Cutting for Historical Swordsmanship
Topic: Jian style cutting with a European sword
Replies: 1
Views: 6613

I like the multiple cuts. 1 cm... very nice.
by PaulC
Wed Mar 29, 2006 12:45 pm
Forum: Test Cutting for Historical Swordsmanship
Topic: Soft Target Standardization
Replies: 4
Views: 8807

tatami omote

I'm strongly for using tatami omote as the standard. Not the only material, but the standard to compare others to. If we disregard price ( and I'll get back to that in a moment) we want to find a material for soft cutting that we can use as a standard referenced to gauge our skills and progress. I h...
by PaulC
Wed Mar 29, 2006 11:03 am
Forum: Test Cutting for Historical Swordsmanship
Topic: What not to use
Replies: 8
Views: 12430

inspect the handles

Another area where there is a lot of neglect is with the handle. An antique sword with a pristine blade will most likely need the handle replaced or at least re done because of dried out wood, sloppy fit, cracked mountings etc etc. This happens a lot with older Japanese swords ?the sword may look to...